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Speaking, Hearing and Understanding the Stories We Hold as Health Care Providers

Speaking, Hearing and Understanding the Stories We Hold as Health Care Providers

Research colleagues that I enjoyed working with on this project.

Speaking, Hearing and Understanding the Stories We Hold as Health Care Providers
Patricia McGillicuddy, Tracy Johnson, Phyllis Marie Jensen, Margaret I. Fitch, Merle Audrey Jacobs

The authors focus on the results of a qualitative study by a team of social work and nursing researchers investigating the nature and extent of vicarious traumatization in the work experience of 20 physicians, nurses, and social workers during professional training and in clinical practice.  The authors take a qualitative, narrative approach to understanding the professional care experiences and workplace context reflected in stories that are remembered as difficult, unresolved, or worrisome. A number of recurring themes emerged from the research as contributing to the development of vicarious traumatization and aiding or hindering its resolution.
There was significant overlap among both the themes and the nature of the stories told among the professions interviewed. The deliberative delineation of these themes in education, mentorship and practice may assist in recognizing and ameliorating traumatic effect and enhancing hope and pride. This points to the need for heightened awareness and interdisciplinary education focused on the emotional impacts of working with patients/clients in health care team settings and the powerful potential of storytelling.

http://www.casw-acts.ca/en/csw-abstracts

Merle Jacobs

From Rangoon to London then to Canada, now home. Professor at York U in Toronto. Equity Studies.

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11-member Burma parliamentary delegation meets with CFOB by Tin Maung Htoo

11-member Burma parliamentary delegation meets with CFOB by Tin Maung Htoo

Information Release by Canadian Friends of Burma (CFOB)– April 26, 2013
Ottawa – An 11-member Burma parliamentary delegation visited Ottawa this week in exchange of the Canadian parliamentary delegation sent off to Burma earlier this year. During one-week long visit, they toured on the Parliament Hill, held meetings and discussions with their counterparts, and observed the Canadian political systems and parliamentary practices.
A day before their departure, the delegation met the executive members of CFOB Board of Directors at the Lord Elgin Hotel in Ottawa on April 26 in the morning, and discussed the current political reform process, challenges ahead and future prospects for the amendment of the 2008 Constitution. Discussion also included the role in which Canadian civil society organizations could play during the transitional period.
The delegation has left early this morning Friday from Ottawa and currently on their way back to Burma. The Canada Parliamentary Centre organized the visit of the delegation (and some details may be inquired directly).
MPs and government officials included in the team are as follows:
1.     Mr. Thuyain Zaw, Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee and Member of Parliament USDP
2.    Mr. Ko Ko Tun, Secretary of the International Relations Committee and Member of Parliament USDP
3.    Miss Khin Thanda, Member of Parliament NLD
4.    Mrs. Khin San Hlaing, Member of Parliament NLD
5.    Mr. Ye Tun, Member of Parliament, Shan Nationalities Democratic Party
6.   Mr. Htun Aung Kyaw, Member of Parliament Rakhaine Nationalities Development Party
7.    Dr. Banyar Aung Moe, Member of Parliament, All Mon Regions Party
8.   Mr Aung Zin, Member of Parliament, National Democratic Force Party
9.   Mr. Khun Ling, Member of Parliament, Chin Progressive Party
10.  Mr. Kyaw Soe, Director General of Parliament’s Office
11.   Mrs. Thida Tun, Deputy Director General of Parliament’s Office
Executive board members of CFOB who met the delegation are as follows:
1.     Dr. Merle Jacobs (Chairperson)
2.    Mr. Timothy Zaw Zaw  (Vice-Chairperson)
3.    Ms. Thet Thet  Htun (Secretary)
4.    Mr. Tin Maung Htoo
You can view photo of CFOB and Burma’s Parliamentary delegation: https://twitter. com/mhtin88/ status/327487093 188227073/ photo/1
The Canadian Friends of Burma (CFOB) is incorporated, national non-governmental organization working for democracy and human rights, peace and equality in Burma since 1991. Our objective is to support the Burmese Democratic Movement, in particular democratic rights and fundamental freedoms of all citizens of Burma.
http://www.cfob. org/

Merle Jacobs

From Rangoon to London then to Canada, now home. Professor at York U in Toronto. Equity Studies.

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Bangladesh, am I self centered?

Bangladesh, am I self centered?

Bangladesh what is this? Maybe they were going to get me a new type of expensive food. I know they only want the best for me. I was sitting in my sun room thinking of what next to eat when I heard Mother Merle talking to Dad about this. She just goes on and on. Always saying something of how these people in developed countries should be tried for murder.
Oh no, people died! It was about cheap labour in another country. All I do is think about myself and never what happens to others. That is how it should be for my kind in this world. So this has nothing to do with me, I can go back to sleep.
After all, if humans do not care about others why should a privileged cat take an interest in human rights and social justice. They are just big words with no real meaning when it comes to buying clothes, and all the other things my human parents buy. So why are they upset, must be a human thing to do – be upset and do nothing to change their way of living.  Selfish they sometimes call me, no it is just being me. Human’s are the selfish lot. They do not care about how others live in another country. I watch TV so I do see stuff.  I tune my parents  talk out but if the continue talking they will not bother what I am doing or not doing. Human concerns with no actions, makes for my liberty to sleep, eat, and sleep – I want humans to stop discussing this and act on something.

Daisy Jacobs-De La Maza

Loved by many, bi-racial, and happily retired.
I enjoy long naps, and the occasional snack.

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11-member Burma parliamentary delegation meets with CFOB which I Chair

11-member Burma parliamentary delegation meets with CFOB which I Chair

Information Release by Canadian Friends of Burma – April 26, 2013 (for the full release please view guest blog on this site)

Ottawa – An 11-member Burma parliamentary delegation visited Ottawa this week in exchange of the Canadian parliamentary delegation sent off to Burma earlier this year.

A day before their departure, the delegation met the executive members of CFOB Board of Directors at the Lord Elgin Hotel in Ottawa on April 26, 2013,

Executive board members of CFOB who met the delegation are as follows:

1.     Dr. Merle Jacobs (Chairperson)
2.    Mr. Timothy Zaw Zaw  (Vice-Chairperson)
3.    Ms. Thet Thet  Htun (Secretary)
4.    Mr. Tin Maung Htoo

In terms of my visit, I found all members to be interested in education for the peoples of Burma. The females MPs and I had a chance of speaking 1:1. Their concerns included economic development which would help the population. Having not spoken Burmese for decades, I was able to understand most of the discussion but could only speak a few sentences. This meeting was productive and informative. I provided a copy of my book Women’s Work to each member; sending one to Daw Aung  Suu Kyi.

Merle Jacobs

From Rangoon to London then to Canada, now home. Professor at York U in Toronto. Equity Studies.

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Collegiality

Collegiality

Collegiality is a research area of interest. I have looked at this issue as it related to professionalism within nursing, a female dominated profession.

My first survey in 1994, some 19 years ago, provided data that started the process in the area of collegial .

The analysis from my data provided original and multiple insights about contemporary female occupational cultures. It is disheartening to find out from colleagues (Lister, 2013; Brinkert, 2010) how women’s work environments are at a decline in many ways. The implication of work milieu in current research associates this environment with negative professional behaviours and quality of patient care.

Most mainstream studies on the nursing profession – usually the only available texts – tend to adopt a simplistic framework of “problems and prospects”, whereas my research has assembled data regarding the unhealthy contradictions perpetrated by the professional/ collegial values and routine practices. Here, however, we see the social reproductions of institutionalized injustice, notably the ethos of white superiority. The silent voices of the “racialized” others speak loudly to the dominant culture of compliance that is protected in self-serving professions. Rather than debunk mythologies, I consider those themes that have been woefully overlooked in studies of professions—social justice. Justice, an increasingly significant theme in public policy and multicultural programs, provides a direction that is long overdue in addressing micro conflicts within macro contexts.

Merle Jacobs

From Rangoon to London then to Canada, now home. Professor at York U in Toronto. Equity Studies.

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